activism politics transition towns

Transition towns and the new politics

The Transition movement is adamant that it has no political affiliation, but in her column yesterday Madeleine Bunting suggested that it might just be an alternative to politics – a new politics outside of Westminster and the party system:

If you want to catch a glimpse of the kinds of places outside the political mainstream where that new politics might be incubated, take a look at the Transition movement. Ed Miliband, the energy and climate change secretary, was one of the first to spot its potential when he described this young and fast-growing movement as “absolutely essential”. Other politicians have been similarly intrigued, and last year The Transition Handbook came fifth in MPs’ list of summer reading. It isn’t hard to see why politicians are so interested. The Transition movement is engaging people in a way that conventional politics is failing to do. It generates emotions that have not been seen in political life for a long time: enthusiasm, idealism and passionate commitment.

Seems like a good day for Transition St Albans to be hosting its first public event.

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