miscellaneous

What we learned this week

Yes magazine reports on twenty years of the world’s biggest seagrass restoration project, located off Virginia. More of this.

In conversation about his new book, this interview with Amitav Ghosh covers climate change, colonialism, violence and degrowth – unusual and vital perspectives on the crisis from a writer of global importance.

Amy Westervelt makes the environmental justice case for organic agriculture – not because it’s better for your health, but because it’s better for the health of farm workers.

We don’t hear very much about climate adaptation in the world of plant science, but their successes or failures could affect billions of people in the years to come. The Crop Trust have just announced a more climate resilient potato, cross-bred with wild varieties to make it resistant to blight.

In case you missed it, Radio 4 ran the documentary The Black and the Green on Wednesday, presented by Weyland McKenzie-Witter and well worth a half hour of your time. (I’m in it, briefly)

The colour of climate change

Last year I wrote this post about two-tone representations of the earth, and how they obscure the unequal impacts of climate change. It’s an idea that gets a one line mention in the book, but one that a few people have picked up on when I’ve used it in talks or conversations – including at […]

What can hydrogen do for developing countries?

So far in my series on hydrogen, I have looked at how it can be produced and how it can be used. Inevitably that brings technology to the fore, with hydrogen fuel cell vehicles, electrolysers and the like. A lot of the news on that front comes from richer countries with money for cutting edge […]

The scale of global e-waste

Today is International e-waste day, which aims to raise awareness of waste electronics. It’s a growing problem, as more people buy phones, laptops and other gadgets, and as they are replaced at a faster rate. If you average the problem across the global population, 7.6kg of e-waste is created every year for every person on […]

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