miscellaneous

What we learned this week

Much has been written about how Russia’s attack on Ukraine will affect oil and gas prices. And then food prices. It will also affect the production of electric cars, since Russia is a big exporter of nickel.

With the government contemplating more oil, fracking and turning to our reliable friends in Saudi Arabia for help getting off Russian gas, wouldn’t renewable energy and efficiency be better options? 350.org are asking people to write to their MPs about a Green New Deal.

It’s always worth paying attention to whatever the Drawdown folks are up to, and their Drawdown Stories are looking at applying low carbon principles in specific neighbourhoods. The first example, Pittsburgh, features 11 short documentaries highlighting people taking action.

I wrote about the world’s first carbon neutral cheese recently, and there’s a similar story to be told about Jude’s, the carbon negative ice cream company.

In unrelated personal news, my book Max Counts to a Million was children’s book of the week in The Times last weekend, and on Wednesday copies were hidden all over the country by The Book Fairies. We’ve also done a blog tour this week, and since there’s a lot going on, I’ve built a dedicated website for my children’s writing. Just in case you don’t want to miss out.

Some blog highlights from this week:

Sustainable fashion with The Little Loop

Fashion is one of the less obvious contributors to climate change. It doesn’t always get mentioned alongside the cars, gas boilers or coal power stations that dominate discussion of how to reduce emissions. But when you stop and add it up, the impact of the fashion industry is significant and not particularly easy to tackle. […]

Take climate action with The Jump

I’ll be honest, I was a little sceptical about The Jump. For a start, does the world need another attempt at creating a movement around small actions for the climate? Isn’t there one that you could join already? And secondly, there are quite a lot of things called The Jump, including an ill-advised ski-jumping TV […]

Can you build a house to last a thousand years?

There are various ways to make something sustainable. As this post about toasters demonstrated, you could take one of at least three different approaches. You can make something easy to repair. You can make it 100% recyclable. Or you can make it indestructible. These approaches can be seen in architecture too. Waste is a serious […]

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