miscellaneous

What we learned this week

Years ago I wrote about the problem of waste tyres. While alternatives exist, there is little incentive for the big companies to make better tyres. Make them responsible for disposal and this will change – and here’s an article from the BBC about what future tyres might look like.

Homes For Us is a new campaign around social housing from the New Economics Foundation, a neglected solution to Britain’s slow motion crisis in housing.

Here’s a strange thing: this month the cost of filling a family car with petrol or diesel went past £100 for the first time. The government responded by cutting 5p off fuel duty. At the same time, the government withdrew all subsidies for electric vehicles, which are the a key part of the long term solution to fossil fuel dependency.

Simon Evans of Carbon Brief highlights how government documents on the Sizewell C nuclear power plant have redacted the value-for-money estimates. We’re not being told.

I’ve spent all week working on a new children’s book, which reminds me – Max Counts to a Million is now available as an audiobook, if anyone’s been waiting for that.


On the subject of children’s books, here’s one that I’d like to give a shout-out to. I just finished reading Burning Sunlight to the kids this week, and we all loved it.

It tells the story of Zaynab, who is from Somaliland and finds herself trying to fit in at a school in Devon. She meets local boy Lucas, and they organise school strikes and take on an oil company and a corrupt politician.

It’s the first time I’ve read a story with a character from Somaliland, which Anthea Simmons deliberately chose as a climate vulnerable country. The book is full of discussions of climate justice and climate privilege, protest, grief, and different kinds of bravery.

Available from Earthbound Books UK and US.


It was great to be able to run two guest posts from Harriet Bergman this week, based on her academic work on eco-fascism. It’s not something I’ve written about myself, but we may be hearing more about eco-fascism in future, and a primer is useful. If you missed them, links below:

The past, present and future of eco-fascism

Guest post by Harriët Bergman, who is studying for a PhD at the Centre for European Philosophy at the University of Antwerp. Her research focuses on how feminist and anti-racist thinking can inform discussions on climate breakdown concerning privilege, guilt, denial, power and social change. With more extreme forms of politics on the rise, eco-fascism […]

Avoiding eco-fascist creep

Guest post by Harriët Bergman, who is studying for a PhD at the Centre for European Philosophy at the University of Antwerp. Her research focuses on how feminist and anti-racist thinking can inform discussions on climate breakdown concerning privilege, guilt, denial, power and social change. In part one of this two-part series, I looked at […]

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