miscellaneous

What we learned this week

Ripple is a new energy start-up that is inviting customers to buy shares in a wind farm, making it the first to be owned by its customers. There are community energy groups that might argue that’s only true as a technicality, but it’s still a good idea that supports energy democracy.

Canada has set out proposals for a net zero by 2050 climate target. Yes. Do it Canada.

“As anti-racists, we cannot be against ‘racial’ inequality at home, while at the same time perpetuate ‘racial’ inequality abroad through exploitative consumption habits” argues Samir Sweida-Metwally in this Bristol University Press article on ethical consumerism and racism.

Solar Oysters is a company that plans to use solar power to automate floating oyster farms in the Chesapeake Bay, producing food while cleaning the water – a potentially regenerative form of ocean farming.

Onshore wind and solar are back in the picture in Britain, as the government allows them to be included in next year’s Contracts for Difference auction (a form of subsidy). They have been excluded since 2015 for no good reason, so this is good to see.

This week’s posts:

What we learned this week

At just the time when we need to be expanding sustainable travel options, Eurostar has announced that post-Brexit passport checks have reduced capacity at international stations, forcing them to raise prices and reduce the number of trains. Worth catching this conversation with Greta Thunberg and Kevin Anderson, which ranges across activism, honesty and alarmism, regulation […]

Interview: Raj Patel on The Ants and the Grasshopper

Raj Patel is an author, academic and activist, best known for books such as Stuffed and Starved, The Value of Nothing, or A History of the World in Seven Cheap Things. He is also a film-maker, and the director of The Ants and the Grasshopper, reviewed here and currently in cinemas. JW: You’ve been an […]

Manchester’s vibrant new electric buses

Electric vehicles tend to get more attention, but at the top of the sustainable transport hierarchy sits the humble bus. If the active transport options of walking and cycling aren’t available, then the bus is the greenest form of transport there is. And so today I wanted to draw your attention to a place that […]

The Year of Living Danishly, by Helen Russell

On our family holidays this year we took the train to Sweden, and spent some time in Copenhagen on the way. The city immediately lodged itself in my list of favourite places. Nowhere is perfect, but Copenhagen seemed to be getting more things right than most, with great public spaces, an obvious sense of public […]

1 comment

  1. Do the Canadians plan to shut down the tar sands mines? It’s my understanding that their laws are so restrictive that they cannot refine that gunk in Canada, so the pipelines send it to the US.

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