miscellaneous

What we learned this week

Ripple is a new energy start-up that is inviting customers to buy shares in a wind farm, making it the first to be owned by its customers. There are community energy groups that might argue that’s only true as a technicality, but it’s still a good idea that supports energy democracy.

Canada has set out proposals for a net zero by 2050 climate target. Yes. Do it Canada.

“As anti-racists, we cannot be against ‘racial’ inequality at home, while at the same time perpetuate ‘racial’ inequality abroad through exploitative consumption habits” argues Samir Sweida-Metwally in this Bristol University Press article on ethical consumerism and racism.

Solar Oysters is a company that plans to use solar power to automate floating oyster farms in the Chesapeake Bay, producing food while cleaning the water – a potentially regenerative form of ocean farming.

Onshore wind and solar are back in the picture in Britain, as the government allows them to be included in next year’s Contracts for Difference auction (a form of subsidy). They have been excluded since 2015 for no good reason, so this is good to see.

This week’s posts:

What we learned this week

A news update first: this week I signed a book deal with Icon Books. Is Climate Change Racist? is slated for publication in early summer. For those who have been waiting for it, thanks for your patience! It’s on its way. AFP Factcheck, the largest journalistic verification operation on the internet, has put together a […]

Building of the week: Preston Bus Station

Whether you appreciate its aesthetic or not, there’s no doubt that Brutalism gave us some of the 20th century’s most distinctive buildings. Named after the french word for raw or untreated, the architectural movement used exposed concrete to create stark and angular buildings. Done badly, it meant grey soulless monoliths, ugly and unloved and hardly […]

The weight of the human world

2020 may have marked a strange symbolic moment: when the weight of the human world overtook the weight of the natural living world. A paper in the Nature journal has attempted to quantify and compare these two measurements. On one side is the weight of all the world’s living things, the forests and the plants […]

Funding boost for Africa’s Great Green Wall

The Great Green Wall is one of the world’s most ambitious environmental initiatives: to create a continent-spanning band of green across the Sahel, regreening the region and preventing the Sahara desert from spreading south. Environmental projects don’t come much bigger than this. It involves cooperation across 11 different countries over a 8,000 kilometre stretch, restoring […]

1 comment

  1. Do the Canadians plan to shut down the tar sands mines? It’s my understanding that their laws are so restrictive that they cannot refine that gunk in Canada, so the pipelines send it to the US.

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