miscellaneous

What we learned this week

Ripple is a new energy start-up that is inviting customers to buy shares in a wind farm, making it the first to be owned by its customers. There are community energy groups that might argue that’s only true as a technicality, but it’s still a good idea that supports energy democracy.

Canada has set out proposals for a net zero by 2050 climate target. Yes. Do it Canada.

“As anti-racists, we cannot be against ‘racial’ inequality at home, while at the same time perpetuate ‘racial’ inequality abroad through exploitative consumption habits” argues Samir Sweida-Metwally in this Bristol University Press article on ethical consumerism and racism.

Solar Oysters is a company that plans to use solar power to automate floating oyster farms in the Chesapeake Bay, producing food while cleaning the water – a potentially regenerative form of ocean farming.

Onshore wind and solar are back in the picture in Britain, as the government allows them to be included in next year’s Contracts for Difference auction (a form of subsidy). They have been excluded since 2015 for no good reason, so this is good to see.

This week’s posts:

Can we trust aviation industry promises?

It went away for a while during the turmoil of Covid lockdown, but Luton’s airport expansion plans are back and going strong. When I ask about the environmental impact, I know exactly what answer I’ll get: details of all the things they’re doing to make ground operations low carbon. The planes? Not their problem. It’s […]

Changing climate opinion in UK newspapers

Last year I wrote about the shift in climate rhetoric from British newspapers, with the Mirror, the Sun and the Daily Express all launching new green campaigns. The latter was the biggest surprise, having spent years regularly trashing climate science and renewable energy. The change is more than anecdotal though. Researchers at Carbon Brief keep […]

Guest post: Debt and the climate crisis – a perfect storm

A guest post from the Jubilee Debt Campaign to mark their rebrand to Debt Justice this week. We all know the climate crisis is here, it is devastating people’s lives now and urgent action must be taken. But we won’t get very far unless we also address harmful debt in lower income countries. Debt might […]

Book review: The Climate Change Cook Book

I figured it would be a matter of time before somebody wrote a climate change cook book. Despite the title, I’m not quite convinced this is it. It’s a collection of fairly generic recipes with an introduction about climate change, and then they more or less forget about the theme afterwards. It makes me wonder […]

1 comment

  1. Do the Canadians plan to shut down the tar sands mines? It’s my understanding that their laws are so restrictive that they cannot refine that gunk in Canada, so the pipelines send it to the US.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

%d bloggers like this: