miscellaneous

What we learned this week

Ripple is a new energy start-up that is inviting customers to buy shares in a wind farm, making it the first to be owned by its customers. There are community energy groups that might argue that’s only true as a technicality, but it’s still a good idea that supports energy democracy.

Canada has set out proposals for a net zero by 2050 climate target. Yes. Do it Canada.

“As anti-racists, we cannot be against ‘racial’ inequality at home, while at the same time perpetuate ‘racial’ inequality abroad through exploitative consumption habits” argues Samir Sweida-Metwally in this Bristol University Press article on ethical consumerism and racism.

Solar Oysters is a company that plans to use solar power to automate floating oyster farms in the Chesapeake Bay, producing food while cleaning the water – a potentially regenerative form of ocean farming.

Onshore wind and solar are back in the picture in Britain, as the government allows them to be included in next year’s Contracts for Difference auction (a form of subsidy). They have been excluded since 2015 for no good reason, so this is good to see.

This week’s posts:

Book review: A Bigger Picture, by Vanessa Nakate

Africa is the continent that will suffer most from climate change, and yet it is the most invisible in global climate discussions. So Vanessa Nakate is absolutely right when she says that “it’s vital that the fight against climate change includes voices like mine.” Nakate is a climate striker from Uganda, pioneering the local movement […]

What we learned this week

The airline Alitalia went bust (again) this month. Italy’s succesful high speed train network is a big part of the reason why. The formal objectives of the upcoming COP26 climate talks have been published. Worth a browse if you’re following the talks. The Bureau of Investigative Journalism expose the connections between deforestation in the Amazon […]

Colonised countries and carbon footprints

In my book I write about the connection between climate change and colonialism, and how old injustices and power structures are reproduced through the climate crisis. There’s a whole other book to be written about how colonialism has shaped global emissions, contributes to specific vulnerabilities, and holds back solutions. But that’s for another time. Today, […]

The moral hazard of hydrogen

I’ve been writing about hydrogen over the last few weeks, investigating its various benefits in decarbonising the energy system, transport, industry and much else besides. But there also drawbacks and potential risks. The biggest of them is kind of obvious when you realise that gas companies are among the most vocal advocates of hydrogen. The […]

1 comment

  1. Do the Canadians plan to shut down the tar sands mines? It’s my understanding that their laws are so restrictive that they cannot refine that gunk in Canada, so the pipelines send it to the US.

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