miscellaneous

What we learned this week

“Over the next decade, our superblock plan will transform the entire central grid of the city into a greener, pedestrian-friendly and almost car-free area” – the mayor of Barcelona, Ada Colau, writes in the Guardian about the city’s ambitious plans.

Five years after the Paris Agreement, Climate Change News rounds up what has worked and what hasn’t so far.

Georgia senator David Perdue is a noisy climate denier who encouraged Trump to pull out of the Paris Agreement. But, says The Intercept, a stone’s throw from his own house is a sea wall erected to protect his neighbourhood from rising sea levels.

I was very disappointed to learn that The Correspondent, a new reader-supported news platform that I have really enjoyed this year, is to close. It was brilliant and would have worked in almost any year but 2020.

Thanks to those of you who have been using Earthbound Books, which is going well. Just a reminder that if you’re buying books for Christmas, the 16th is the last day to process orders.

Speaking of books, some good news this week on that front. I’ve had an offer for my book on climate and race, with plans to publish next year. Still discussing details at the moment, but I hope to be able to confirm things and tell you more next week.

LATEST POSTS

Where did all the SUVs come from?

One of the banal hazards of my life is the traffic of the school run. The school is on a side street that was probably perfectly adequate for generations, but is now regularly choked with queueing cars. One of the reasons it gets blocked is that cars are so huge. It’s almost surreal, seeing these […]

Vegan honey and our relationship with nature

This week I came across an intriguing company called MeliBio that has developed a vegan honey. They have broken down the process that bees use to make honey and then replicated it using fermentation. It’s not a synthetic alternative to honey. It is biologically identical, even though no bees were involved. It is ‘animal free’. […]

Book review: Building for Hope, by Marwa al-Sabouni

Marwa al-Sabouni is an architect from Homs in Syria. She lost her practice in the fighting, but chose to stay in the city with her family and play a role in its rebuilding. Little known outside the region, she became internationally recognised after the publication of her book The Battle for Home, which told her […]

What we learned this week

With the Biden administration looking to set its climate targets, Vox asks what a ‘fair’ target might be – with some suggesting it would be over 100%. “In America, we’re taught from a young age that the coolest thing in the world is to be a big man with a big car who eats big […]

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