miscellaneous

What we learned this week

The Climate Crisis film festival ran in November, and this week launched an online hub where you can watch 20 climate documentaries for £10. Some really good ones on there and I’ll be doing that myself. And as a reader of this blog, you can get yourself a 20% discount by clicking here and using the code GREENCHRISTMAS

Amazon is now the biggest corporate purchaser of renewable energy in the world. This does not make them good, it makes them fractionally less evil – but it’s a step in the right direction.

I hadn’t heard of ‘coral refuges’ before, but I was glad to hear that ocean currents can create pockets of cooler water that coral can flourish in, such as this one of the Kenyan coast.

David Powell is wise and funny and well worth reading on eco-anxiety in the latest issue of the New Economics Zine.

It’s always worth keeping an eye on what Drawdown are up to. Their latest report is called Farming our way out of the climate crisis and I’m going to try and make time for it this week.

LATEST POSTS

The risk of hydrogen colonialism

Last week I wrote about the moral hazard of hydrogen, a cautionary tale of how the ‘hydrogen revolution’ could lead us astray and play into the hands of the fossil fuel industry. With more of a global perspective, there’s another risk that I want to briefly look at today: hydrogen colonialism. What do I mean […]

Book review: A Bigger Picture, by Vanessa Nakate

Africa is the continent that will suffer most from climate change, and yet it is the most invisible in global climate discussions. So Vanessa Nakate is absolutely right when she says that “it’s vital that the fight against climate change includes voices like mine.” Nakate is a climate striker from Uganda, pioneering the local movement […]

What we learned this week

The airline Alitalia went bust (again) this month. Italy’s succesful high speed train network is a big part of the reason why. The formal objectives of the upcoming COP26 climate talks have been published. Worth a browse if you’re following the talks. The Bureau of Investigative Journalism expose the connections between deforestation in the Amazon […]

Colonised countries and carbon footprints

In my book I write about the connection between climate change and colonialism, and how old injustices and power structures are reproduced through the climate crisis. There’s a whole other book to be written about how colonialism has shaped global emissions, contributes to specific vulnerabilities, and holds back solutions. But that’s for another time. Today, […]

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3 comments

  1. Thanks for highlighting the Kenyan coral refuge. I know we need far deeper concern, alarm even, over our corals, but it’s encouraging to know of signs of hope too. I was reminded of the discoveries of resilience in the Red Sea and off Australia, and other measures to protect/restore them:
    https://phys.org/news/2020-12-coral-recovery-prolonged-heatwave.html
    https://theconversation.com/meet-the-super-corals-that-can-handle-acid-heat-and-suffocation-122637
    https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2020/oct/17/why-there-is-hope-that-the-worlds-coral-reefs-can-be-saved
    [hoping this comes across as ‘interested interaction/reaction’ stimulated by your post, which is the intention here, not as ‘competitive reportage’]

    1. Interested interaction noted! These stories are important, as it’s felt like the loss of coral reefs is almost inevitable. If that’s the only narrative we have, it risks becomes self-fulfilling.

      1. yes I have a feeling that’s how things should work on other issues too. I feel we need to be conversing on how things will turn out both worse and better than we anticipate, but there’s always a path to hope. I’m glad that sites like yours are bringing this out

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