miscellaneous

What we learned this week

A striking climate change conundrum has emerged in Namibia, where drought threatens the survival of 200 elephants. The government’s solution? Sell the elephants.

My wife, who is a BBC radio journalist, recorded a special programme on ‘earth heroes’ in our local area. It features activists, inventors, entrepreneurs and more, and you can listen back here.

People have been talking about geothermal power from Cornwall for decades and the potential has never been properly tapped, so it’s great to hear that the first commercial contract has been signed to supply it. (It’s with Ecotricity, once again with another UK first.) It’s only for 3MW of power at the moment – but you’ve got to start somewhere.

Good to read about an amendment to the Basel Convention on waste trading, that will hopefully give developing countries more ways to prevent plastic dumping by overdeveloped nations.

This graph of new car sales in Norway, posted by Robbie Andrew on Twitter, shows how pure petrol or diesel cars are now very much a minority interest. This is a dramatic shift in a decade, and the kind of thing I would hope to see in Britain in the coming years – alongside an overall decline in car sales and increased public and active transport, naturally.

Three of this week’s posts, in case you missed them:

Book review: Footprints, by David Farrier

In 2013 a storm revealed fossil footprints on Happisburgh beach in Norfork. At 900,000 years old, they were the earliest evidence of humans in Britain – a remarkable echo of the distant past that vanished again as quickly as it appeared. That same year, the earth’s atmosphere crossed the symbolic threshold of 400 parts per […]

What we learned this week

Coutts, London’s elite bank for the wealthy and the royals, has become a B-Corps – quite a statement of intent from the 300 year old instution. “The fossil fuel sector is not about to turn its back on hydrocarbons. It has seen a beacon of hope in plastics”. DW.com have a nicely designed feature on […]

Creating a more inclusive economy

In the past 18 months, the UK has depended on its key workers to keep country running during the pandemic. While many people stayed locked down at home, key workers went to work in healthcare, kept the supermarkets open, ran government and council services, and delivered us the things we need. Despite being vital to […]

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