miscellaneous

What we learned this week

New Zealand has declared a climate emergency and that the government will try to get its own emissions to net zero by 2025. (It got less coverage, but Japan declared a climate emergency a couple of weeks ago too.) These are symbolic of course, but they are also a powerful statement of intent.

How adding seaweed to cattle feed can reduce emissions. The easiest way to reduce beef emissions is to reduce beef consumption of course, but this is useful too.

I learn from the Spokesmen Cycling Podcast that cargo bikes move 3.5 kph faster than vans in central London, making them a faster way to make local deliveries as well as a cleaner one.

“Rich countries have disproportionate influence when it comes to setting the rules of international trade and finance” writes Jason Hickel, highlighting the colonial influences in the IMF and World Bank.

Have you seen the front cover of The Economist this week? ‘Making coal history’ is the cover story.

I gave a talk last week on climate, race and privilege, for my friends at Christian Climate Action. With apologies for the quality of the Zoom recording, here it is. If people find this useful, I might try and record a better version.

This week’s post in case you missed them:

LATEST POSTS

What we learned this week

Coutts, London’s elite bank for the wealthy and the royals, has become a B-Corps – quite a statement of intent from the 300 year old instution. “The fossil fuel sector is not about to turn its back on hydrocarbons. It has seen a beacon of hope in plastics”. DW.com have a nicely designed feature on […]

Creating a more inclusive economy

In the past 18 months, the UK has depended on its key workers to keep country running during the pandemic. While many people stayed locked down at home, key workers went to work in healthcare, kept the supermarkets open, ran government and council services, and delivered us the things we need. Despite being vital to […]

Timor-Leste – the first plastic neutral country?

In her book #Futuregen – Lessons from a Small Country, the Welsh politican Jane Davidson argues that small countries can be useful test cases for innovative policy. Her own innovation was the world’s first legally binding commitment to future generations. Delivered in Wales first, other countries have since studied the legislation in the hope of […]

What we learned this week

I’ve enjoyed Foreign Policy magazine since I was an international relations student, so I was delighted that they’ve published an excerpt of my book: The racial violence of climate change. On other book related matters, I recorded a podcast with Dr Myriam Francois of We Need to Talk About Whiteness and that came out this […]

Loading…

Something went wrong. Please refresh the page and/or try again.

2 comments

  1. Yes indeed on e-bikes point: it reminds me of this: https://www.eav.solutions
    I saw an independent write up(s) of these people; I think major logisics firms are seriously interested because they have major advantages for ‘last mile’ delivery, which is the area logicstics firms are finding hard to crack (both economics and sustainability I think). Our ‘pipe dream’ for Chipping Norton is to have a ‘community last mile delivery depot’ run as a COMMUNITY social enterprise, using bikes like these.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

%d bloggers like this: